Advocacy E-News

October 31, 2018

 

NAMI NJ SUPPORTED BILLS MOVE IN THE NJ LEGISLATURE

Two NAMI New Jersey supported bills moved closer to adoption in Monday’s legislative session. A2031 requires New Jersey regulated health insurers to provide coverage for behavioral health care services and enhances enforcement and oversight of behavioral health parity laws. The bill passed 73-2 with 2 abstentions and now moves to the State Senate for consideration. Now is the time to thank your Assembly member for supporting this bill and to ask your State Senator to become a co-sponsor of S1339

The State Senate passed S959 that establishes New Jersey Caregiver Task Force to evaluate and provide recommendations on caregiver support services by a vote of 40 to 0. The Task Force is to include the Executive Director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness New Jersey. The companion bill A3514 now awaits a vote by the full Assembly.

 

RUTGERS RECEIVES $4.2 MILLION MENTAL HEALTH GRANT

Rutgers University was awarded a $4.2 million federal grant to training mental health physicians, the university announced today. With the money from the U.S. Department Health and Human Services, the Rutgers’ Department of Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Counseling is creating a regional Mental Health Technology Transfer Center, designed to implement the most recent treatment techniques

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SOLITARY CONFINEMENT WILL BE SHORTENED AT THIS JAIL AS PART OF LAWSUIT SETTLEMENT

Nearly three years after inmates sued the Middlesex County Jail over their “inhumane” stays in solitary confinement; the county and the ACLU have reached a settlement that will change the way the punishment is used. Individuals with a mental illness are often placed in solitary confinement because of their difficulty in following jail procedures.

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DOES FEAR OF REPORTING THEIR OWN MENTAL ILLNESS PUT DOCTORS AT RISK OF SUICIDE

A landmark 2004 Harvard study found male physicians were 40 percent more likely to die by suicide, and female physicians were 200 percent more likely to take their own lives. Research shows long work days, constant sleep deprivation, a sense of guilt and a fear of showing weakness are factors. Other research shows that mental health questions on physician license applications keep doctors from seeking counseling, while failing to actually identify unstable and unsafe doctors.

Go to the PBS News Hour report